The Unity difference is going beyond creating a sustainable structure; it’s about forethought and features that strengthen the integrity of a home so it’s designed to last for hundreds of years. I had the privilege to check out 10 Rose Douglas during the assembly stages and noticed a few key elements that demonstrated their technical innovations.

Having recently joined the real estate world, this was my first time at a construction site. As I looked towards the ceiling, I noticed a string of pre-cut holes running through the beams. Upon questioning the significance of such a design, I was informed they are for the plumbing and wiring of the house. Traditionally, a plumber would come into a new build and drill holes as they saw fit to place in the plumbing. This would not only take more time (and money) but depending where the holes would be drilled, they could affect the strength of the wood. Unity uses an advanced CNC (computer numerical control) machinery which ensures that they use the minimum amount of wood to make the maximum amount of house. Part of that includes pre-determining where cut outs will be to not only save materials, but to keep the structural integrity.

While surveying the exterior, I once again came upon pre-cut holes this time at the corners of the home. Because Unity is built off location, these allow the builders to use extra long nails to tighten the structure at the joints. It was another way that Unity’s ingenuity streamlines the efficiency of building a home. I’m looking forward to continually checking in on Douglas Ridge to see how this conservation development comes together.